4th Annual National Opioid Crisis Management Congress
September 9-10, 2019 * Fairmont Scottsdale Princess Scottsdale, AZ

4th Annual National Opioid Crisis Management Congress

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About the Conference

National attention is focused on the opioid crisis, and communities are struggling to respond. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, as the clinical use of opioids has risen over the past two decades, opioid-associated harm has risen in parallel.

Chronic pain affects approximately 100 million Americans, making it one of the most common reasons for patients to seek medical care. Over the past decade there has been a four-fold increase in opioid prescribing. During the same time period there was a four-fold increase in unintentional opioid overdose deaths, and a five-fold increase in substance abuse treatment admissions for prescription opioid addiction.

The ongoing opioid crisis lies at the intersection of two substantial public health challenges—reducing the burden of suffering from pain and containing the rising toll of the harms that can arise from the use of opioid medications.

This conference will address the state of the science in pain management, characterize the epidemiology of the opioid epidemic, and identify actions that can be taken to respond to this crisis. Gain expert insight into an epidemic from top thought leaders in opioid management who will share their latest research and real world knowledge in the evolving paradigm of opioids in medicine. In addition, experts at the state and federal levels providing leadership on the opioid public health crisis will present developing collaborative strategic partnerships to serve our most vulnerable citizens.

Who Should Attend?

From Hospitals/Health Systems/Health Plans/Gov’t Agencies/Law Enforcement

  • CEO
  • CFO
  • VP
  • Medical Directors
  • Behavioral Health Directors
  • Pharmacy Directors
  • Clinical Pharmacists
  • Social Workers
  • Outreach Coordinators
  • PDMP Directors
  • Pain Management Directors
  • Psychiatrists
  • Psychologists
  • Telehealth Directors
  • State Health Directors
  • Nursing Director
  • Emergency Room Directors
  • Substance Abuse & Prevention Directors
  • Pediatricians
  • Law Enforcement
  • Narcotic Enforcement
  • Physicians
  • Quality Improvement Director
  • Family Services Director
  • Clinical Directors
  • Investigators
  • Compliance Director
  • Correctional Coordinators

This Event Will Also be if Interest to:

  • Pharmaceutical Companies * Law Firms * Consultants * Drug Development Companies * Vendors * Solution Providers

Conference Agenda

Day One – Monday, September 9, 2019

7:15am – 8:00am

Conference Registration & Networking Breakfast

8:00am – 8:15am

Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

8:15am – 9:15am

Keynote: How Medication-Assisted Treatment Can Improves Outcomes for Patients with Opioid Use Disorder

Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) is an effective treatment for managing opioid use disorder and reducing the risk of death from overdose. Defined as the use of medications in combination with behavioral therapies to provide a whole-patient approach to substance use disorder, it continues to be a subject of great controversy. Most abstinence-focused groups are still hesitant to adopt the use of MAT, regardless of the fact that individuals receiving it often demonstrate dramatic improvements in addiction-related behaviors and psychosocial functioning. In addition, MAT is often unavailable due to inadequate funding for treatment programs and a lack of qualified providers capable of delivering these therapies. This keynote will address the three primary FDA-approved medications for MAT along with their clinical efficacy and areas of debate including diversion. In addition, best practices for patient care will also be highlighted.

Jake Nichols, PharmD, MBA
Chief Executive Officer
Strategic Recovery Resources, LLC

9:15am – 10:00am

How Managed Care Organizations, State, and Community Organizations Partnered to Improve Access and Outcomes for Patients with Opioid Use Disorder

Many states are trying to understand how to combat the opioid crisis. Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) is an effective approach for managing and reducing the risk of death from opioid use. However, the lack of MAT providers and a complete continuum of care for opioid use disorders can pose as a unique challenge to each jurisdiction and state. Additionally, opioid treatment is often inadequately funded and some states may be hesitant to widely adopt and promote the use of MAT. This session will address primary components of creating a successful opioid treatment model of care, which can be implemented across the state while partnering with key agencies and stakeholders. In addition, best practices for an opioid treatment continuum of care will be highlighted along with outcomes data.

John A. Johnson, MD, MBA, FACP
Chief Medical Officer
Virginia Premier

10:00am – 10:30am

Networking & Refreshments Break

10:30am – 11:15am

Implementing the CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain

Guidelines from around the world help direct physician and clinicians to provide the best possible use of long-term opioid therapy in the management of patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. The USA CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain is a 50-page document published in 2016 with consensus by expert authors. The important characteristics and limitations of this impactful guideline will be presented in detail. The clinician will come to understand how to modify their use of opioid therapy in the management of long-term pain as suggested by the CDC Guideline. The CDC Guideline will be compared with other national opioid guidelines from around the world and areas of agreement and controversy will be compared and explained.

Paul A. Sloan, MD
Professor of Anesthesiology
Vice Chair of Research
Associate Program Director, Pain Medicine Fellowship

University of Kentucky Healthcare
Editor-in-Chief
Journal of Opioid Management

11:15am – 12:00pm

Addiction Medicine: Where We Have Been and Where are Going

Physicians are relatively new to the addiction treatment landscape. The talk will cover the history of physicians’ role in treating addiction as a medical disease from the origins of organized addiction medicine through the present day. Important milestones will be described and future directions will be elucidated.

Timothy K. Brennan, MD
Director, Addiction Institute
Mount Sinai

12:00pm – 1:00pm

Lunch

1:00pm – 1:45pm

Opioid Use Disorder and Pain Management: How Pharmacists Can Help

Managing pain in patients who have mental or behavioral health disorders presents many challenges. Stigma surrounding addiction has detrimental effects on patients with comorbid chronic pain conditions—despite evidence that addiction is a disease with the same genetic transmissibility as many other chronic diseases. Clinical pharmacists play an integral role in educating these patients about appropriate opioid use. This session will feature a clinical pharmacist who will discuss addiction as a chronic disease and how addiction affects treatment.

Leeann K. Webster, RPh, CDE
Assistant Director, Ambulatory Clinical Pharmacy Programs
Geisinger

1:45pm – 2:45pm

Panel: Integrated and Coordinated Opioid Treatment Care and Improving Access to Addiction Care

Research has proven that effective care coordination increases efficiency and improves clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. And while connecting people to treatment and recovery support has been shown to be effective and can save lives, the addiction care system continues to face tremendous change and upheaval. This panel will assist you in the development of strategies to improve the collaboration between opioid treatment providers and the systems needed to coordinate care. You will also learn recent developments aimed at improving access to addiction care, including medication-assisted treatment. Topics will include:

- Potential future developments related to substance use disorder treatment
- The future of medication assisted treatment, delivery system reforms, and opportunities available for improving policy moving forward
- Strategies for getting ahead of the problem, and how upstream prevention action can restore hope and lead to a brighter and healthier future for generations to come

Panelists:

Bakahia Madison, PsyD, LCPD, CADC
Chair and Professor
Oakton Community College

Isabel Nino-de-Guzman, PhD, CSAT-S
Clinical Psychologist
Gentle Path at The Meadows

Susan Hawk, MS, LPCC-S, LSW, CGP
System Director-Behavioral Health
Bon Secours Mercy Health

2:45pm – 3:15pm

Networking & Refreshments Break

3:15pm – 4:00pm

To Save a Life: Emergency Medicine and the Opioid Epidemic

Emergency departments across the United States have treated patients with opioid use disorder for decades. The current opioid epidemic has led to unprecedented numbers of patients presenting to emergency departments for treatment of life-threatening overdoses, infectious disease complications related to intravenous drug use, and assistance with initiating long-term treatment for their opioid use disorder. Emergency medicine has taken a leading role to halt the opioid epidemic and reduce the number of opioid related deaths. This session will review a number of the innovative strategies implemented by emergency departments to address these issues including opioid light pain management, naloxone education, opioid prescription monitoring, and initiation of medication-assisted treatment.

Tyler W. Barrett, MD, MSCI, FACEP, FHRS
Associate Professor
Medical Director
Department of Emergency Medicine
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

4:00pm – 4:45pm

The Opioid Crisis: Law Enforcement’s Response

Addressing the opioid epidemic requires a multifaceted approach to engage all potential stakeholders. Collaboration between state agencies and regulatory boards can prove effective. Engaging and educating the business sector, especially those with the highest potential for opioid use disorder, is another vital element in overcoming the opioid epidemic. This session will provide an overview of the opioid epidemic, including the impact on business and industry, law enforcement and regulatory responses to address the opioid epidemic, and creating effective partnerships to overcome the opioid epidemic.

John Dowdy
Director
Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics

4:45pm – 5:30pm

Convening Strategies to Address the Opioid Epidemic

Recent data from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health suggests a 5% decrease in opioid-related overdose deaths in the state from 2016 to 2017. Specific communities within the state also experienced similar improvements. In Worcester, MA, the number of opioid-related emergency medical services incidents decreased by 6.7% from 2016 to 2017, although overdose deaths have remained constant. Since the emergence of the opioid epidemic, the city of Worcester has launched a community-wide response to address this public health issue. This effort addresses the wide spectrum of social determinants of health, from childhood trauma in the public schools to incarceration. In order to fight this epidemic, it is important to bring all stakeholders to the table and decide what and how each one contributes. The Worcester Department of Health and Human Services focuses on simultaneously engaging institutions addressing the upstream determinants and downstream impacts of addiction, including grassroots and policy organizations. Doing so creates a strong and united community response necessary to combat the opioid epidemic.

Matilde Castiel
Commissioner of Health and Human Services
The City of Worcester

5:30pm

Day One Concludes

Day Two – Tuesday, September 10, 2019

7:15am – 8:00am

Networking Breakfast

8:00am – 8:15am

Chairperson’s Recap

8:15am – 9:00am

How Insurers Can Help Fight the Opioid Epidemic

Of the approximately 100 million Americans who take prescription opioids each year, almost 3 million receive their prescriptions from five to as many as 20 different physicians. The practice, often called “doctor shopping,” allows opioid-addicted individuals to consume an enormous and dangerous number of pills with the unwitting help of doctors. Doctor shopping also lets drug dealers use the healthcare system to subsidize their business. Doctor shopping is possible because none of the doctor shoppers’ prescribers knows that they are only one of many providers of opioids. Enter someone with full information: the insurer. This session will discuss the role of health plans in curbing the opioid crisis. Topics will include:

- Using innovative data analysis to monitor opioid prescribing of providers
- Reducing rates of overdose and deaths
- Implementing a community-based outreach and intervention
- Steps to curb the abuse of opioid prescriptions

Karen DePasquale, LSW
Associate Vice President Clinical Affairs and Clinical Business Operations
UPMC Health Plan

9:00am – 9:45am

Medication Assisted Treatment and Supporting Communities though Collective Impact

Community Medical Services has established itself as a national leader when it comes to integrating MAT into criminal justice programs. Community Medical Services supports three different state departments of corrections, six county jails and four Diversion Courts. With close communication between the courts, jails and system partners, offenders have been provided a better set of options and opportunities on the road to recovery. Community Medical Services also developed and implemented the first 24-7 Opioid Treatment on Demand (OTOD) clinic. Audience members will leave the presentation with a working knowledge of how to develop and implement initiatives, utilizing Collective Impact, implementing and sustaining peer support, outcomes for criminal justice programs, along with an analysis of the country’s first 24-hour opioid treatment clinic and how it continues to change the ability to respond to community partners.

Michael C. White, MCJ
Director of Community Programs
Community Medical Services

9:45am – 10:15am

Understanding the Genetic Roots of Addiction and Reward Deficiency Syndrome

Learn how we can determine genetic influencers on predispositions toward various addictive behaviors and mental health conditions. Why are so many individuals falling victim to the chain of addictive behaviors and becoming part of the worst epidemic in the history of the word? The answer is, in part, both genetic and environmental (epigenetic). We will explore the causes and solutions. The chemical messengers (neurotransmitters) in the brain are like keys that turn on various functions of genes. The neurotransmitters that participate in evoking pleasurable feelings in the reward circuitry, work in a cascading fashion throughout the brain. These interactions (Brain Reward Cascade) may be viewed as activities of subsystems within a greater system, merging in cascade fashion toward a particular effect. Compromised DNA with risk variations (alleles) can predispose them to become victim to the chain of addictive behaviors and other mental health conditions. But in many cases, reaching a healthy balance of neurotransmitters can be achieved once the cause has been identified.

Lyle R. Fried, CAP ICADC CHC CRRA
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer
The Shores Treatment and Recovery

10:45am – 11:30am

Safer and Effective Opioid Prescribing Practices

Providers who prescribe opioids to treat chronic pain are in a key position to balance the benefits and risks of chronic opioid therapy (COT). However, providers struggle with the need to assist their patients with adequate management of chronic pain while confronting the risks associated with opioid prescribing. This session will provide recommendations for safer and more effective prescribing of opioids. Topics will include:

- Identify opioid practice updates as outlined in the CDC opioid guidelines
- Monitoring and documentation strategies to meet best practice standards and medical and legal requirements
- Apply a practical framework for decision-making on the initiation, dosage modification, and when and how opioids should be discontinued
- Tools to adequately assess risk in patients being considered for opioid therapy
- Limiting the use of opioid prescriptions for combatting pain and recommending new treatments for pain management without the use of addictive substances

Timothy A. Munzing, MD
Family Medicine Residency Program Director
Kaiser Permanente
Medical Expert Consultant
Drug Enforcement Administration

11:30am – 12:15pm

Addressing the Role of the Dental Profession in the Opioid Crisis

Dentists’ opioid prescriptions constitute 10-12% of all prescriptions and are thereby among the top opioid prescribers. Pain management in dentistry is predominantly related to acute pain, either due to oral infections (such as cavity related abscesses) or to invasive surgical procedures (such as removal of wisdom teeth). Three particular impacts relate to dentists’ prescriptions. They are the most frequent in the 10-19 and 20-29 year old age groups; studies indicate that 1/3 of prescriptions are unrelated to invasive procedures; there is strong evidence that a combination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and Acetaminophen are more effective than opioids to address acute dental pain. Thus, the most important activities to address the role of the dental profession in the opioid crisis are breaking old dogma through continuing education around effective pain management and using innovative education methods to activate dentists as well as dental students and residents. In addition, education of patients to change expectations around dental related pain is important. Finally, the presentation will address dentists’ important role in the interprofessional collaboration with physical health and behavioral health to contribute to the patients’ total health situation, since many individuals with SUD have health behaviors that may also be challenging for their oral health.

Eli Schwarz, KOD, DDS, MPH, PhD
Professor and Chair, Department of Community Dentistry
Oregon Health & Science University School of Dentistry

12:15pm

Conference Concludes

Workshop – Tuesday, September 10, 2019

12:30pm – 2:30pm

A Role for Telehealth As Part Of OUD Treatment

Telehealth is increasingly being explored as a way to effectively deliver OUD treatment. This presentation will review the existing OUD treatment gap and the ways in which telehealth platforms may be used to provide care for those who would otherwise be without access. The potential applications of telehealth for treatment of OUD will be discussed along with a review of current regulations, as well a context for best practice and standards of care. Attendees will also become familiar with potential challenges to implementation and proposed legislative changes that will impact care delivery.
Learning Objectives:

1) Attendees will become familiar with the potential role for telehealth in the treatment of OUD.
2) Attendees will understand the current regulations surrounding telehealth use in OUD treatment.
3) Attendees will comprehend the existing challenges for telehealth implementation.

Michael Frost, MD, FACP, FASAM
Chief Medical Officer
Longbridge Health Solutions
Medical Director
The Frost Medical Group, LLC

About the Speaker:

Dr. Michael Frost is an internationally recognized specialist in the field of addiction medicine. He is board certified in both addiction medicine and internal medicine, and, is a fellow of both The American Society of Addiction Medicine and The American College of Physicians and is a member of The Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine. He is the President and Medical Director of The Frost Medical Group, LLC in Conshohocken PA and currently serves as Chief Medical Officer for Longbridge Health Solutions as well being the former Medical Director of Eagleville Hospital. He is actively involved in clinical research and new treatment development and has provided guidance to the FDA, Centers for Medicare/Medicaid and Health Canada. Dr. Frost lectures internationally and provides consulting services to numerous healthcare organizations, treatment facilities, and the media.

Featured Speakers

Jake Nichols, PharmD, MBA

Jake Nichols, PharmD, MBA

Chief Executive Officer

Strategic Recovery Resources, LLC

John A. Johnson, MD, MBA, FACP

John A. Johnson, MD, MBA, FACP

Chief Medical Officer

Virginia Premier

Paul A. Sloan, MD

Paul A. Sloan, MD

Professor of Anestesiology, Vice Chair of Research, Associate Program Director, Pain Medicine Fellowship

University of Kentucky Healthcare
Editor-in-Chief
Journal of Opioid Management

Timothy K. Brennan, MD

Timothy K. Brennan, MD

Director, Addiction Institute

Mount Sinai

Leeann K. Webster, RPh, CDE

Leeann K. Webster, RPh, CDE

Assistant Director, Ambulatory Clinical Pharmacy Programs

Geisinger

Susan Hawk, MS, LPCC-S, LSW, CGP

Susan Hawk, MS, LPCC-S, LSW, CGP

System Director-Behavioral Health

Bon Secours Mercy Health

Tyler W. Barrett, MD, MSCI, FACEP, FHRS

Tyler W. Barrett, MD, MSCI, FACEP, FHRS

Associate Professor, Medical Director, Department of Emergency Medicine

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

John Dowdy

John Dowdy

Director

Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics

Matilde Castiel

Matilde Castiel

Commissioner of Health and Human Services

The City of Worcester

Karen DePasquale

Karen DePasquale

Associate Vice President Clinical Affairs and Clinical Business Operations

UPMC Health Plan

Michael C. White, MCJ

Michael C. White, MCJ

Director of Community Programs

Community Medical Services

Lyle R. Fried, CAP ICADC CHC CRRA

Lyle R. Fried, CAP ICADC CHC CRRA

Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

The Shores Treatment and Recovery

Timothy A. Munzing, MD

Timothy A. Munzing, MD

Family Medicine Residency Program Director

Kaiser Permanente
Medical Expert Consultant
Drug Enforcement Administration

Eli Schwarz, KOD, DDS, MPH, PhD

Eli Schwarz, KOD, DDS, MPH, PhD

Professor and Chair, Department of Community Dentistry

Oregon Health & Science University School of Dentistry

Michael Frost, MD, FACP, FASAM

Michael Frost, MD, FACP, FASAM

Chief Medical Officer

Longbridge Health Solutions
Medical Director
The Frost Medical Group, LLC

Bakahia Madison, PsyD, LCPD, CADC

Bakahia Madison, PsyD, LCPD, CADC

Chair and Professor

Oakton Community College

Isabel Nino-de-Guzman, PhD, CSAT-S

Isabel Nino-de-Guzman, PhD, CSAT-S

Clinical Psychologist

Gentle Path at The Meadows

Venue

Fairmont

Fairmont Scottsdale Princess
7575 East Princess Drive
Scottsdale, AZ 85255
480-585-4848
“Mention BRI Network for a Special Discounted Rate of $229/night – Reserve Early!”

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FAQ

Are there group discounts available?

  • Yes – Register a group of 3 or more at the same time and receive an additional 10% off the registration fee

Are there discounts for Non-Profit/Government Organizations?

  • Yes – please call us at 800-743-8490 for special pricing

What is the cancellation policy?

  • Cancellations received 4 weeks prior to the event will receive a refund minus the administration fee of $225. Cancellation received less than 4 weeks prior to the event will receive a credit to a future event valid for one year.

Can the registration be transferred to a colleague?

  • Yes – please email us in writing at info@brinetwork.com with the colleague’s name and title

Where can I find information on the venue/accommodations?

  • Along with your registration receipt you will receive information on how to make your hotel reservations. You can also visit individual event page for specific hotel information. The conference fee does not include the cost of accommodations.

What is the suggested dress code?

  • Business casual. Meeting rooms can sometimes be cold so we recommend a sweater or light jacket

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