2024 Advanced Wound Care Congress

February 26-27, 2024 * JW Marriott New Orleans * New Orleans, LA

2024 Advanced Wound Care Congress

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With the increasingly aging U.S. population and the rise in at-home post-operative recovery, one out of three of the home health population has a wound. So, how do healthcare organizations ensure their wound care programs not only maintain clinical excellence but also leverage the opportunity at hand to benefit from favorable reimbursement rates? This conference serves as a forum to connect wound care healthcare leaders with the foremost experts in wound care to improve patient outcomes through education. A knowledgeable and confident wound care staff positively impacts patient relationships—leading to faster healing and improved care quality, and, ultimately, more patients treated and increased success for your healthcare organization. The expert line-up of faculty, in-depth discussions and evidence-based practices and techniques are unparalleled. You'll receive invaluable wound care education that you can put into practice to improve the lives of your patients. Learn new, advanced wound care treatments and technologies to better care for patients and enhance their knowledge. This conference offers practical strategies you can immediately implement into your practice. Increase your skills and understanding of current trends in wound care and network with practicing wound care clinicians.

Who Should Attend?

From Hospitals/Health Systems

  • Physicians
  • Nurses
  • Medical Directors
  • Wound Healing
  • Clinicians
  • Physical Therapists
  • Patient care
  • Podiatrists
  • Surgeons
  • Physician Assistants
  • Dietitians

 

Also of interest to Vendors/Solution Providers/Sales & Marketing

Conference Agenda

Day One - Monday, February 26, 2024

7:15am – 8:00am
Conference Registration & Networking Breakfast 

8:00am – 8:15am
Chairperson’s Opening Remarks 

8:15am – 9:00am
Wound Biofilm Injection and Closure
Polymicrobial chronic wound biofilm aggregates formed by an iterative play between pathogenic processes and host defense are unique and not represented by biofilm formed in other experimental conditions devoid of host immune defense. Biofilms are hostile microbial aggregates because, within their polymeric matrix cocoons, they are protected from antimicrobial therapy and attack from host defenses. Biofilm-infected wounds, even when closed, show functional deficits such as deficient extracellular matrix and impaired barrier function, which are likely to cause wound recidivism. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate for human infectious diseases caused by bacteria with a biofilm phenotype is 65 percent and the National Institutes of Health estimate is closer to 80 percent. The management of invasive wound infection often includes systemic antimicrobial therapy in combination with debridement of wounds to a healthy tissue bed as determined by the surgeon who has no way of visualizing the biofilm. The exceedingly high incidence of false-negative cultures for bacteria in a biofilm state leads to missed diagnoses of wound infection. The use of topical and parenteral antimicrobial therapy without wound debridement has had limited impact on decreasing biofilm infection, which remains a major problem in wound care. Current claims to manage wound biofilm infection rest on limited early-stage data. In most cases, such data originate from limited experimental systems that lack host immune defense. In making decisions on the choice of commercial products to manage wound biofilm infection, it is important to critically appreciate the mechanism of action and significance of the relevant experimental system. Preclinical and early clinical studies demonstrate that an electroceutical approach to biofilm management holds promise. Rapid biological responses are driven by electrical signals generated by ion currents moving across cell membranes. Bacterial life, growth, and function rely on a bioelectrical milieu, which when perturbed impairs their ability to form microbial biofilm.

Chandan K. Sen
Director
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine  

9:00am – 9:45am
A Global Perspective on Wound Care
The development of an interprofessional team approach to the care of acute and chronic wounds is a worldwide challenge. This global unmet need has recently been recognized by the World Health Organization and addressed by the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care Global Volunteers program. This session will provide an overview of the escalating international wound problem and explore current programs established to deal with wounds in resource-poor countries.

Ottamissiah (Missy) Moore, BSN, RN, WCC, DWC, CHPN
Nurse Educator
BridgePoint Healthcare

9:45am – 10:15am
Networking & Refreshments Break 

10:15am – 11:00am
Hidradenitis Suppurativa: The Biggest Missed Opportunity in Wound Care
HS is very common, and patients are seeking wound care at increasing rates. However, no dedicated solutions are offered. In this session, disease diagnosis and recent emerging therapies will reviewed briefly specific wound care recommendations will be presented and a look to a better future for wound management in HS will be envisioned. 

Hadar Lev-Tov, MD, MAS
Associate Professor
Director, Wound Healing Fellowship
Vice President, Hidradenitis Suppurativa Foundation
Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine
University of Miami Health System

11:00am – 11:45am
Early Clinical Recognition of Chronic Osteomyelitis in the Diabetic Foot Wound
Early recognition of chronic osteomyelitis in a diabetic foot wound is crucial to expedite formal diagnosis and treatments. Physical therapists practicing in PT-driven wound clinics, without physician oversight, are limited within the PT practice act; requiring additional communication and coordination of care to arrange for physician referrals, imaging, arterial studies and labs to confirm osteomyelitis. Early diagnosis is essential to optimize treatment for limb preservation and prevent surgical measures. This session aims to discuss how to optimize treatment outcomes for osteomyelitis; including antibiotic management, debridement, controlling diabetes, smoking cessation, and offloading with a total contact cast. Further research is indicated on removable offloading devices and their effectiveness on healing plantar diabetic foot wounds when the total contact cast is not appropriate.  

Kristin Bojrab, PT, DPT, WCC, CFCS, CFNIP, DWC, FACCWS
Wound Care Physical Therapist
Eskenazi Health

11:45am – 12:30pm
Complex Wound Management
Wound healing is a critical physiological process to maintain the integrity of the skin as a mechanical barrier after trauma. It can be generally divided into hemostatic, inflammatory, proliferative and remodeling phases. Complex wounds classically arrest in the inflammatory phase without further progression. Many factors can lead to this, including poor systemic conditions or poor local tissue environments such as vascular compromise or infection. Proper understanding of the healing process is essential when addressing any complex wound. This session will explore the evaluation and treatment of complex wounds and highlight the importance of the interprofessional team approach when evaluating patients with this condition. Topics to be discussed will include:

  • Basic concepts of wound healing and factors that affect the healing process
  • How to evaluate patients presenting with complex wounds
  • The current practice in the treatment of complex wounds
  • The management by an interprofessional team in dealing with complex wounds.

Karen L. Bauer, DNP, CWS, DAPWCA
Director of Vascular and Wound Services
The University of Toledo 

12:30pm – 1:30pm
Luncheon 

1:30pm – 2:15pm
Doing the Right Thing: Ethics and Wound Care
When treating patients with chronic wounds, clinicians often face situations that require application of ethical principles, such as the decision regarding when palliative care should be initiated, or when a wound should be classified as "nonhealable" or "maintenance" based on their ability to heal. Topics in this session to be discussed will include:

  • Overview of principles of ethics: beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy and justice
  • Ethical principles and dilemmas in wound care
  • A practical approach to applying principles of ethics in wound care and solving dilemmas

Fedor Lurie, MD, PhD, RPVI, RVT, FSVS
Associate Director
Jobst Vascular Institute,
Adjunct Research Professor
Division of Vascular Surgery
University of Michigan 

2:15pm – 3:15pm
Panel: Wound Care Treatment – The Importance of Collaboration
Often when patients come in for chronic wound care treatment, the wound is not the only issue they need to address. An entire host of complications can cause a wound, which means patients need several medical professionals working together to understand how to treat the underlying condition that prevents a wound to heal completely. Through interdisciplinary collaboration, doctors formulate a comprehensive treatment plan to help their patients heal as quickly as possible. Topics to be discussed will include:

  • What is collaborative treatment?
  • The silo mentality
  • Integrating new treatment modalities
  • Bringing in outside help

Panelists:

Karen L. Bauer, DNP, CWS, DAPWCA
Director of Vascular and Wound Services
The University of Toledo 

Kristin Bojrab, PT, DPT, WCC, CFCS, CFNIP, DWC, FACCWS
Rehabilitation Services
Burn Unit/Wound Clinic
Eskenazi Health

3:15pm – 3:45pm
Networking & Refreshments Break

3:45pm – 4:30pm
Technological Advances in the Management of Chronic Wounds
Wound treatment comprises a substantial portion of the healthcare budgets. Studies suggest that about 50% of patients admitted to hospitals have wounds, while 1%−2% of the general population in the suffers from chronic wounds. Chronic wounds fail to repair themselves within the expected period of 30 days. Technologies have been developed to address challenges encountered during wound care with the aim of alleviating pain, promoting healing, or controlling wound infections. This session will explore the technological improvements that have been made in this field over time.

Charles Andersen, MD, FACS, FSVS, MAPWCA
Chief, Wound Care Services
Madigan Army Medical Center 

4:30pm – 5:15pm

Joyce M. Black, PhD, RN, FAAN
Florence Niedfelt Professor of Nursing
College of Nursing

University of Nebraska Medical Center

 

5:15pm
End of Day One

Day Two – Tuesday, February 27, 2024

7:15am – 8:00am
Networking Breakfast 

8:00am – 8:15am
Chairperson’s Recap 

8:15am – 9:00am
You Cannot Treat What You Can’t See: Fluorescence Imaging in Bacterial Detection in Nonhealing Wounds
A 350 patient clinical trial demonstrated published in 2020 demonstrated that the clinical signs and symptoms detect clinically significant levels of bacteria less than 15% of the time.  A subsequent publication showed that the semi-quantitative cultures used in hospital microbiology labs are inaccurate and unreliable. This has led to the rampant misuse of antibiotics and topical antimicrobials in the care of patients with nonhealing wounds.  Fluorescence imaging increases the sensitivity of bacterial detection four to eleven-fold. It is pigment agnostic: It dramatically improves the detection of bacteria and infection in drak skinned individuals. Establishing an effective antimicrobial stewardship program requires the use of bacterial diagnostics. Real world evidence on the reduction of antibiotic use in wound clinics following the introduction of fluorescence imaging will be presented. This lecture will explore the growing body of evidence on bacterial detection in nonhealing wounds and provide guidance on establishing an antibiotic stewardship program. 

Thomas E. Serena, MD, FACS
Founder and CEO
Serena Group

9:00am – 9:45am
Fungal Infections: A Hidden Burden
In the southern U.S., wound care professionals are encountering a burgeoning threat: fungal infections. As co-morbidities and immunocompromised conditions become increasingly common, the risk of fungal colonization grows. The consequences are three-fold: prolonged healing times, complicated care requirements, and significant cost implications due to misdiagnoses and inadequate treatment. The key to combating this challenge lies in awareness: learning to identify and effectively treat fungal infections equips healthcare professionals to tackle this rising issue.

Jana Montagnino, RN, BSN, WCC, OMS
Inpatient Wound Care Nurse
LCMC Health 

9:45am – 10:15am
Networking & Refreshments Break 

10:15am – 11:00am
Dietician’s Role in Wound Management
The role of the dietitian is emphasized as a critical component of the healing process for pressure injuries and wounds , and sets guidelines for nutrient recommendations, screening for malnutrition and overall nutritional status, as well as the ideal full nutrition assessment to assist in management of chronic disease impacting wound progression. Participants can expect to take away the following:

- Understand how nutrition impacts the wound healing process

- Why it is important to include the RD in the Wound Care Team

- Understand how and why the Dietitian conducts a Nutrition Assessment

Aharon Roberts, MA, RD, NWCC
Outpatient and Wound Care Dietitian
Veterans Health Administration 

11:00am – 11:45am
Elephant in the Wound: Tackling the Enormous Problem of Wound-Associated Pain
Pain is an unwelcome companion for most acute and chronic wounds, and a growing body of evidence shows that physiologic changes associated with uncontrolled pain directly impair wound healing. Beyond this, pain experienced with the delivery of wound care may result in patients or caregivers rushing or truncating such care, increasing the risk of an incomplete and/or unsanitary result. This session will review mechanisms of pain and the physiologic consequences for wound healing, introduce strategies for predicting and mitigating severe pain with the delivery of wound care, compare pros and cons of commonly used analgesics for wound-associated pain, and explore non-pharmacologic approaches to pain control.

Benjamin M. Cherry, MD, FACP
Assistant Professor, General Internal Medicine
Director, Internal Medicine Subinternship
Yale School of Medicine
VA Connecticut Healthcare

11:45am – 12:30pm
Complexity of Antimicrobial Resistance in the Chronic Wound Microbiome
Impaired healing of chronic ulcers has been associated with microbiome dysbiosis and prolonged inflammation leading to growing population of affected patients and astronomic heath care costs. The impeding problem of antibiotic resistance in microorganisms is a global health concern. While previous studies mainly focused on descriptive characterization of the microbial composition, metagenomic and functional characterization of the chronic microbiome identified prevalence of antibiotic resistance and its association with the non-healing. The most recent findings document that chronic wound microenvironment could influence selection of strains with the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, which should be of great importance for making informed clinical decisions. In addition, the most common wound colonizer Staphylococcus aureus is capable to reside inside the human cells to escape antimicrobials and host immune response. Novel treatment strategies including the use of probiotics and postbiotics will be discussed emphasizing the importance to reduce the risk of multi drug resistance in patients affected with chronic wounds.  

Irena Pastar, PhD
Associate Professor
Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery
Wound Healing and Regenerative Medicine Research Program
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine

12:30pm
Conference Concludes 

Workshop - Tuesday, February 27, 2024

12:45pm – 2:45pm
Novel Technologies in Advanced Wound Care
This workshop will provide practical hands-on instruction on several wound care techniques: Fluorescence imaging to detect bacteria, the application of topical oxygen therapy, an update on dressing choices, and vascular screening.

Learning Objectives:

- Utilize fluorescence imaging to improve the detection of bacteria in wounds and guide debridement.

- Apply topical oxygen for nonhealing diabetic foot wounds.

- Chose the appropriate dressing for a nonhealing wound based on its characteristics.

- Effectively screen patients for vascular disease.

Thomas E. Serena, MD, FACS
Founder and CEO
SerenaGroup 

Khristina Harrell, RN
Chief Nursing Officer
SerenaGroup

Featured Speakers

Chandan K. Sen

Chandan K. Sen

Director

McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine 

Ottamissiah (Missy) Moore, BSN, RN, WCC, DWC, CHPN

Ottamissiah (Missy) Moore, BSN, RN, WCC, DWC, CHPN

Nurse Educator

BridgePoint Healthcare

Hadar Lev-Tov, MD, MAS

Hadar Lev-Tov, MD, MAS

Associate Professor

Director, Wound Healing Fellowship
Vice President, Hidradenitis Suppurativa Foundation
Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine
University of Miami Health System

Kristin Bojrab, PT, DPT, WCC, CFCS, CFNIP, DWC, FACCWS

Kristin Bojrab, PT, DPT, WCC, CFCS, CFNIP, DWC, FACCWS

Wound Care Physical Therapist

Eskenazi Health

Karen L. Bauer, DNP, CWS, DAPWCA

Karen L. Bauer, DNP, CWS, DAPWCA

Director of Vascular and Wound Services

The University of Toledo

Fedor Lurie, MD, PhD, RPVI, RVT, FSVS

Fedor Lurie, MD, PhD, RPVI, RVT, FSVS

Associate Director

Jobst Vascular Institute
Adjunct Research Professor
Division of Vascular Surgery
University of Michigan

Charles Andersen, MD, FACS, FSVS, MAPWCA

Charles Andersen, MD, FACS, FSVS, MAPWCA

Chief, Wound Care Services

Madigan Army Medical Center

Jana Montagnino, RN, BSN, WCC, OMS

Jana Montagnino, RN, BSN, WCC, OMS

Inpatient Wound Care Nurse

LCMC Health

Aharon Roberts

Aharon Roberts

Outpatient and Wound Care Dietitian

Veterans Health Administration

Benjamin M. Cherry, MD, FACP

Benjamin M. Cherry, MD, FACP

Assistant Professor, General Internal Medicine

Director, Internal Medicine Subinternship
Yale School of Medicine
VA Connecticut Healthcare

Irena Pastar, PhD

Irena Pastar, PhD

Associate Professor

Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery
Wound Healing and Regenerative Medicine Research Program
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine

Thomas E. Serena, MD, FACS

Thomas E. Serena, MD, FACS

Founder and CEO

SerenaGroup

Khristina Harrell, RN

Khristina Harrell, RN

Chief Nursing Officer

SerenaGroup

Venue

JW Marriott New Orleans
614 Canal Street
New Orleans, LA 70130
504-581-1000

*Mention BRI Network to get the discounted rate of $269/night or use link below:

https://book.passkey.com/go/BRINetworkConference2024

Sponsors and Exhibitors

 

FAQ

Are there group discounts available?

  • Yes – Register a group of 3 or more at the same time and receive an additional 10% off the registration fee

Are there discounts for Non-Profit/Government Organizations?

  • Yes – please call us at 800-743-8490 for special pricing

What is the cancellation policy?

  • Cancellations received 4 weeks prior to the event will receive a refund minus the administration fee of $225. Cancellation received less than 4 weeks prior to the event will receive a credit to a future event valid for one year.

Can the registration be transferred to a colleague?

  • Yes – please email us in writing at info@brinetwork.com with the colleague’s name and title

Where can I find information on the venue/accommodations?

  • Along with your registration receipt you will receive information on how to make your hotel reservations. You can also visit individual event page for specific hotel information. The conference fee does not include the cost of accommodations.

What is the suggested dress code?

  • Business casual. Meeting rooms can sometimes be cold so we recommend a sweater or light jacket
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