2023 Social Determinants of Health Summit

January 23-24, 2023 * Marriott Maquis San Diego Marina * San Diego, CA

2023 Social Determinants of Health Summit

Day(s)

:

Hour(s)

:

Minute(s)

:

Second(s)

About the Conference:

of health-influencing factors they address to include social determinants of health (SDOH) – economic and environmental conditions that both directly and indirectly impact one’s health – like income, access to health food, and access to transportation. SDOH analytics show that these conditions influence health inequities and have a massive effect on population health outcomes. Addressing social determinants of health will continue to drive a host of evolving policies, initiatives, partnerships and technology across public and commercial domains of the healthcare industry. To advance SDOH efforts, organizations must think differently and consider how well they truly understand the needs of their patient populations and the role that SDOH programs will play in helping close health equity gaps in their community. They must plan differently and develop SDOH initiatives with collective impact in mind; focus on the community and technology partnerships that are foundational for any organization seeking to address consumers’ needs beyond medical treatment. And they must act differently and combine social determinants of health with other consumer insights to develop customized, holistic healthcare plans, grow their network and improve clinical outcomes.

As our population becomes more diverse and at greater risk for poor health outcomes due to the impact of negative social determinants of health, there is a growing need to coordinate services across the care continuum. Connecting and integrating social supports and services into healthcare provision is essential in order to address the broad range of social determinants that play such an important role in health and well-being. This conference will address how much of this can be achieved through various methods of increased collaboration among healthcare professionals, including:

  • How to recognize and integrate social factors that influence health-related behaviors and health status to develop more effective treatment plans.
  • Assessing and addressing social needs through appropriate referrals to ensure adequate support.
  • Developing health-promotion strategies that reach into communities to improve living and working conditions.
  • Conducting or supporting ongoing research regarding social determinants of health and determine which strategies may be most effective in improving health outcomes.
  • Acting as a resource for local, state, and national policy makers to enable improved health equity for all Americans.

This conference will enable healthcare professionals can create a more holistic awareness of the biological, behavioral and social factors that impact health—working together to build a more equitable healthcare system that enables better health outcomes for all.

Who Should Attend?
Medicaid; Medicaid; Commercial Health Plans; Health Systems; Hospitals; Provider Groups; Pharma Organizations; Gov’t and Community Based Organizations

  • Medical Directors
  • CEO’s
  • CFO’s
  • CNO’s
  • Clinical Officers
  • Care/Case Management
  • Population Health
  • Quality Improvement
  • Health and Wellness
  • Accountable Care
  • Physician Groups
  • Community Outreach
  • Foundations
  • Compliance Directors
  • Policy Advisors
  • Social Determinants
  • Innovation Officers
  • Health Equity Officers
  • Behavioral Health

Also of Interest to Vendors and Service Providers

Conference Agenda

Day One - Monday, January 23, 2023
7:15am – 8:00am
Conference Registration & Networking Breakfast

8:00am – 8:10am
Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

8:00am – 8:10am
Chairperson’s Opening Remarks 

8:10am – 8:50am
How Tennessee Medicaid is Addressing Social Drivers of Health to Reduce Health Disparities
With considerable evidence that interventions aimed at social drivers of health can positively influence costs and health outcomes, the discourse is changing among policy influencers and providers to look beyond clinical and disease conditions and address the environmental factors that impact our healthcare system. Medicaid enrollees with complex health needs and unmet social needs are at high risk of hospitalization, institutionalization, and other higher cost services. For example, people experiencing homelessness have higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, HIV, and mortality resulting in longer hospital stays and higher readmission rates than the general public. Addressing social drivers of health is key to advancing health equity and helping people with high health care and social needs. This session will explore how state Medicaid plans are addressing various social drives of health through enhanced care management and community support.

Karly Campbell
Chief Quality Officer
TennCare 

Victor Wu
Chief Medical Officer
TennCare 

8:50am – 9:30am
The Relationship Between Population Health Management and Social Determinants of Health
Population health depends on the ability of providers, payers and other stakeholders to understand the clinical and socioeconomic factors influencing and driving risks across individuals and the communities in which they live. Social determinants of health, such as patients’ income level or access to food and transportation, have been estimated to account for up to 80 percent of a patient’s health outcome. This session will explore tools to enable hospitals and health systems to identify, monitor and target care to patients within a population. You will gain a conceptual foundation to help staff deepen their understanding of population health management and how social determinants of health can be used to improve outcomes.

Angela Lynn
Director, Clinical Teams
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina 

9:30am – 10:00am
Networking & Refreshments Break 

10:00am – 10:40am
Addressing Social Determinants of Health in Your Community
This session will explore the importance of healthcare engagement in economic development. Throughout the world, there are efforts to address social determinants of health. For instance, in the United States, the health objectives for the nation include the goal of create social and physical environments that promote good health for all by addressing social determinants of health. Key action areas include improving governance, community participation, attention to health inequities, and monitoring progress. To achieve this vision will require a whole community approach in which healthcare organizations work together with community partners to assure conditions for health. To be successful, this approach requires changes at the levels of individuals, relationships, communities, and broader systems. It requires environmental, economic, and policy strategies along with individual behavioral change and health services. The approach also requires developing partnerships among different groups including public health, community organizations, education, government, business, and civil society. This session will examine actionable ways for healthcare organizations to engage in local community and economic development initiatives to address social determinants of health.

Jonathan Dayton
Executive Director
Maryland Rural Health Association 

10:40am – 11:20am
Arcadia Session 

11:20am – 12:00pm
How Housing Impacts Maternal Health: Healthy Beginnings At Home

How Housing Impacts Maternal Health: Healthy Beginnings At Home 

This session with review the six year pilot of Healthy Beginnings at Home, a community collaboration between CareSource, Celebrate One, Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authority and City & County partners in Columbus, Ohio. We will review data impacts, cost savings and steps taken for expansion and replication. The pilot success that has lead to over $5 million in non-Medicaid funds in Ohio and Indiana to replicate the model in additional cities.

Kyle Lowe
National SDOH Strategy Lead
CareSource 

12:00pm – 12:40pm
The Future of Social Determinants of Health
This session will offer an open door to all attendees to address the systemic inequities that prevent members of our communities from experiencing good health. Topics will include discussing fundamental definitions of the term, classical and contemporary assessments of the challenges and successes, and new dimensions and strategies to more rapidly and effectively advance the long-term goal of improving community health, well-being and creating inclusive and sustainable local economies. 

Tralonda Triplett, PhD, MPH
Director of Public Health
Center for Policing Equity

12:40pm – 1:40pm
Luncheon 

1:40pm – 2:20pm
Treating the Whole Person: Addressing Social Determinants of Behavioral Health
This session will examine how social determinants of health impact behavioral health outcomes and identify strategies for improving patient and system-level outcomes. Topics to be addressed will include:

–          Current state of behavioral health crisis for adult, adolescent, and pediatric populations

–          Disparities in behavioral health care for specific populations

–          How to assess for social determinants of behavioral health

–          Interventions that address social determinants of behavioral health

–          Description of a pilot project intervention to address social determinants of health for behavioral        health patients

–          How to measure success in improving social determinants of behavioral health

Meghan Frost, MSW, LCSW
Manager, Social Work Case Management
UK HealthCare 

Lella Still, MSSW, LCSW
Director of Behavioral Health Social Work
Eastern State Hospital/Good Samaritan Hospital

2:20pm – 3:20pm
Panel: Engaging Key Players in Key Players in Social Determinants of Health Strategy
As healthcare organizations continue to target the social determinants of health, they must collaborate with other key players to deliver on programs. Social determinants of health and population health are essential considerations for delivering on value-based care. But it takes a village, and organizations need to anticipate a number of stakeholders for making these programs a reality. SDOH programs are inherently multi-stakeholder — they require the medical provider who will identify high-risk patients, fund sources, care coordinators or caseworkers, and the community-based partners that will help carry out interventions. Each of these stakeholders needs to be working in the same direction in order for programs to be successful. This session will explore engaging key players in SDOH strategy.

Panelists:

Chara Abrams
Director, Mission Integration and Community Benefit
CHRISTUS Health 

Ama Atiedu, MS, MSOD
Population Health Program and Evaluation Manager
Cottage Health 

Kim McElroy-Jones, PhD, DMin, MHA, FACHE
Director, Community Partnerships for Community Health
Eskenazi Health 

Julie Orozco-Ferreira, LICSW
Vice President of Behavioral Health
ConcertoCare 

3:20pm – 3:50pm
Networking & Refreshments Break 

3:50pm – 4:30pm
Social Determinants of Opioid Use Behaviors
The non-medical use of prescription opioids and heroin use remain serious public health issues in the United States. Yet, there remains a lack of research attempting to systematically identify specific social determinants linked to these behaviors using national data sources. This session will explore the associations between social determinant of health domains and opioid use behaviors, including (1) economic stability, (2) educational attainment, (3) healthcare access, (4) neighborhood, and (5) social and community context.

Janine Duran Llamzon
Assistant Vice President, Emergency Service Line
Montefiore Health System 

4:30pm – 5:10pm
The Impact of Social Determinants of Health on the COVID-19 Pandemic
The coronavirus caused a global pandemic. The elderly, immunocompromised, and those with preexisting conditions—such as asthma, cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD) or obesity—experience higher risk of becoming severely ill if infected with the virus. Systemic social inequality and discrepancies in socioeconomic status contribute to higher incidence of asthma, CVD, hypertension, CKD and obesity in segments of the general population. Such preexisting conditions bring heightened risk of complications for individuals who contract the coronavirus disease. In order to help vulnerable groups during times of a health emergency, focus must be placed at the root of the problem. Studying the social determinants of health, and how they impact disadvantaged populations during times of crisis, will help governments to better manage health emergencies so that every individual has equal opportunity to staying healthy. This session will review the impact of social determinants of health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Mischael Metelus
Assistant Director Medicare Advantage
MetroPlus Health Plan 

5:10pm
End of Day One

Day Two – Tuesday, January 24, 2023
7:15am – 8:00am
Networking Breakfast 

8:00am – 8:10am
Chairperson’s Recap

8:10am – 8:50am
The Role of Social Determinants of Health in Improving Health Equity
Social factors, signals and biases shape the health of our nation. Racism and poverty manifest in unequal social, environmental and economic conditions, resulting in deep-rooted health disparities that carry over from generation to generation. Efforts to improve health in the U.S. have traditionally looked to the healthcare system as the key driver of health and health outcomes. However, there has been increased recognition that improving health and achieving health equity will require broader approaches that address social, economic and environmental factors that influence health. This session will provide an overview of these social determinants of health and discusses emerging initiatives to address them.

Stephanie Y. Brown, MD, MPH
Emergency Physician
Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Sutter Health | Berkeley Emergency Medical Group
Clinical Lead
Sutter Health Institute for Advancing Health Equity | IAHE

8:50am – 9:30am
Using Health Information Technology to Bring Social Determinants of Health into Primary Care
Several recent national initiatives have called for increased efforts to integrate social determinants of health into healthcare settings using health information technology. However, there is limited evidence to guide the implementation of these recommendations in practice. Research is needed to understand what SDOH information is most important to collect, how SDOH information can be used to inform clinical care and referrals, and ultimately, whether and how integrating SDOH screening and action into primary care affects individual and population health. This session will explore how HIT can be used to bring SDH information into primary care. In this paper, we describe how we are putting this conceptual model into practice within the OCHIN network of community health centers by highlighting examples of ongoing research, identifying knowledge gaps, and outlining a roadmap of future research to move the field forward.

Christina Wolf, MSN, RN, CNL
Executive Director, Population Health & Care Continuum
Lawrence General Hospital 

9:30am – 10:00am
Networking & Refreshments Break 

10:00am – 10:40am
Improving Data Sources for Positive Childhood Experiences Surveillance and Programming
Positive Childhood Experiences (PCEs) are associated with improved health outcomes in youth and adults, and there is an inverse dose-response relationship between exposure to PCEs and poor mental health for children and adults. The benefits of PCEs exist even after controlling for exposure to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), suggesting that promoting PCE exposure may reduce mental health problems in youth and adults. In an effort to develop a system of Positive and Adverse Childhood Experiences (PACEs) surveillance and prevention, the St. Joseph County Department of Health created a survey to assess the prevalence of PCEs among students in public middle and high schools in South Bend, Indiana. Understanding the prevalence of PCEs can provide highly actionable data on the relative risk of ACEs and ACE-associated health outcomes, and establishes shared data points from which intersectional collaboration is possible. This session will cover the study methodology and results, and discuss strategies for and implications of incorporating PCEs surveillance into social determinants of health interventions in the public health, education, and healthcare sectors.

Frank Spesia, M. Ed, MGA
Positive and Adverse Childhood Experiences (PACEs) Coordinator
St. Joseph County Department of Health 

10:40am – 11:20am
Pride in Caring: Emerging Best Practices in LGBTQ+ Patient Services in Rural Communities
In 2019, Cornerstone Whole Healthcare Organization, INC (C-WHO), a rural nonprofit, and Valor, a rural critical access hospital, began to explore opportunities to specifically target more affirming and appropriate services for LGBTQ+ healthcare services. Rural-focused strategies are critical given the significant barriers and inequities within this care setting. Rural communities are on average less accepting of protections for LGBTQ+ individuals while LGBTQ+ patients are more likely to experience behavioral health disorders compared to non-LGBTQ+ peers (Movement Advancement Project, 2019). Through a process based on human-centered design, C-WHO and Valor developed a roadmap for other similar communities of care to 1)more than double sexual orientation/gender identity information capture in the EHR, increase provider comfort and confidence treating patients by more than 70%; 2) develop new inclusive policies; 3)and pilot a novel model for consultative care to allow patients to remain in their communities for services such as PrEP and HRT. The presenters will share key insights regarding best practices, lessons learned, and opportunities to scale enhanced care models for LGBTQ+ patients and other minoritized communities in rural areas.

Rachel Blanton, MHA
COO
Cornerstone Whole Healthcare Organization, Inc. 

11:20am – 12:00pm
Colorado’s Approach to Whole Person Care

For too long, individuals have been responsible for navigating aspects of their health in distinct categories, using fragmented systems which rely on patients to coordinate their own care, even in emergency situations. The State of Colorado recognizes the value of coordinating policy with health information technology to support whole person care which encompasses physical, social, and behavioral health. This session will provide insight into Colorado’s approach to supporting social needs through whole person care at the state- and local-level.

Dianne Primavera
Lieutenant Governor of Colorado
State of Colorado 

Stephanie Pugliese
Office of eHealth Innovation Director
State of Colorado

 

12:00pm – 12:40pm
How Payers are Addressing Social Determinants of Health: Care Collaboration Success
Social determinants of health was a bleeding-edge concept 20 years ago, but today, healthcare payers and providers are starting to incorporate SDOH factors to predict the impact on an individual’s health. Payers and providers must evaluate the holistic patient case, which includes social determinants, and not just treat the immediate patient condition. The healthcare ecosystem continues to operate in silos, with interoperability an ongoing challenge. Data does not flow freely between payers, providers, members/patients, and community resources that can address social factors directly on the ground. Innovative partnerships are showing the way for both payers and providers. This session will explore examples of care collaboration success in a community with a long history of health disparities.

Jim Milanowski
President/CEO
Genesee Health Plan

12:40pm
Conference Concludes

Workshop - Tuesday, January 24, 2023
12:45pm – 2:45pm

Workshop: Investing in impact: Why have current social impact strategies for addressing SDoH failed?
While racial inequities are far from new in the United States, the 2002 IOM Report “Unequal Treatment” raised our collective awareness to the devastating impact of systemic racism in America’s health care system. Though billions of dollars have been invested to address the upstream social determinants that manifest as downstream health consequences, there has been less focus on the relationship between the political determinants of health that influence these social determinants. Furthermore, despite these large-scale investments, health disparities for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) have widened as worsening economic pressures and social needs undermine shared progress. This begs the question: Why have social impact investments not translated to meaningful impact for historically marginalized populations? Health care stakeholders often lack a unified strategy to guide their health equity investments and face challenges measuring the impact of their financial commitments. Recipient and implementing organizations sit closest to the populations experiencing the problems, yet frequently lack the infrastructure and capabilities to activate investments in alignment with the broader ecosystem. This workshop will explore the factors that contribute to failed social impact investments and delineate the new ways of working that are needed to catalyze coordinated, strategic action on social determinants. At the end of this session, participants will:

– Understand the interrelationship between systemic racism and the political and social determinants of health

– Recognize common challenges associated with investments in social determinants of health

– Consider their role in the social impact space and identify ways they can drive organizational and societal change to make social impact strategies more successful

Yele Aluko MD, MBA, FSCAI
Managing Director | Chief Medical Officer
EY Americas

Featured Speakers

Tralonda Triplett, PhD, MPH

Tralonda Triplett, PhD, MPH

Director of Public Health

Center for Policing Equity
Angela Lynn

Angela Lynn

Director, Clinical Teams

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina
Jonathan Dayton

Jonathan Dayton

Executive Director

Maryland Rural Health Association
Karin VanZant

Karin VanZant

VP, National SDOH Strategy

CareSource
Karly Campbell

Karly Campbell

Chief Quality Officer

TennCare
Victor Wu

Victor Wu

Chief Medical Officer

TennCare
Lella Still, MSSW, LCSW

Lella Still, MSSW, LCSW

Director of Behavioral Health Social Work

Eastern State Hospital/Good Samaritan Hospital
Chara Abrams

Chara Abrams

Director, Mission Integration and Community Benefit

CHRISTUS Health
Ama Atiedu, MS, MSOD

Ama Atiedu, MS, MSOD

Population Health Program and Evaluation Manager

Cottage Health
Kim McElroy-Jones, PhD, DMin, MHA, FACHE

Kim McElroy-Jones, PhD, DMin, MHA, FACHE

Director, Community Partnerships for Community Health

Eskenazi Health
Julie Orozco-Ferreira, LICSW

Julie Orozco-Ferreira, LICSW

Vice President of Behavioral Health

ConcertoCare
Janine Duran Llamzon

Janine Duran Llamzon

Assistant Vice President, Emergency Service Line

Montefiore Health System

 

Mischael Metelus

Mischael Metelus

Assistant Director Medicare Advantage

MetroPlus Health Plan
Stephanie Y. Brown, MD, MPH

Stephanie Y. Brown, MD, MPH

Emergency Physician

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Sutter Health | Berkeley Emergency Medical Group
Clinical Lead
Sutter Health Institute for Advancing Health Equity | IAHE
Christina Wolf, MSN, RN, CNL

Christina Wolf, MSN, RN, CNL

Executive Director, Population Health & Care Continuum

Lawrence General Hospital
Frank Spesia, M. Ed, MGA

Frank Spesia, M. Ed, MGA

Positive and Adverse Childhood Experiences (PACEs) Coordinator

St. Joseph County Department of Health
Rachel Blanton, MHA

Rachel Blanton, MHA

COO

Cornerstone Whole Healthcare Organization, Inc.
Jim Milanowski

Jim Milanowski

President/CEO

Genesee Health Plan
Yele Aluko MD, MBA, FSCAI

Yele Aluko MD, MBA, FSCAI

Managing Director | Chief Medical Officer

EY Americas
Venue

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina
333 West Harbor Drive
San Diego, CA 92101
619-234-1500

ROOM BLOCK IS SELLING OUT QUICKLY – ADDITIONAL ROOMS ADDED!

** Mention BRI Network for a discounted rate of $279/night ** or use link below to make reservations:

https://book.passkey.com/e/50338890

Sponsors and Exhibitors

EXECUTIVE SPONSOR

Arcadia is dedicated to happier, healthier days for all. We transform diverse data into a unified fabric for health. Our platform delivers actionable insights for our customers to advance care and research, drive strategic growth, and achieve financial success. For more information, visit arcadia.io.

ASSOCIATE SPONSOR

mPulse Mobile is reimagining health engagement to inspire healthier lives and deeper relationships between healthcare organizations and their consumers. A leading healthcare Conversational AI platform combines with award-winning health education for the streaming age to deliver tailored digital health engagement that nurtures, educates, and activates healthcare consumers. With more than a decade of experience, 150+ healthcare customers and 1 billion conversations annually, mPulse Mobile has the data, the expertise, and the solutions to drive healthy behavior change. To learn more visit mpulsemobile.com.

 

 EXHIBITOR

Mom’s Meals provides refrigerated, ready-to-heat-and-eat meals through Medicaid and Medicare Advantage health plan benefits as well as for direct purchase. By offering many nutritionally tailored options and delivering to homes nationwide, Mom’s Meals fuels better health outcomes for all. Its long-term care, chronic care and post-discharge care programs also allow clients to lead healthier lives while remaining independent at home. For more information, visit www.momsmeals.com.

FAQ

Are there group discounts available?

  • Yes – Register a group of 3 or more at the same time and receive an additional 10% off the registration fee

Are there discounts for Non-Profit/Government Organizations?

  • Yes – please call us at 800-743-8490 for special pricing

What is the cancellation policy?

  • Cancellations received 4 weeks prior to the event will receive a refund minus the administration fee of $225. Cancellation received less than 4 weeks prior to the event will receive a credit to a future event valid for one year.

Can the registration be transferred to a colleague?

  • Yes – please email us in writing at info@brinetwork.com with the colleague’s name and title

Where can I find information on the venue/accommodations?

  • Along with your registration receipt you will receive information on how to make your hotel reservations. You can also visit individual event page for specific hotel information. The conference fee does not include the cost of accommodations.

What is the suggested dress code?

  • Business casual. Meeting rooms can sometimes be cold so we recommend a sweater or light jacket
Request Brochure

Register Your Team Today!

Register Now

Register by December 16th and Save an Additional $100 off the Registration Fee – Mention Promo code WB100!

Ask A Question

Be A Thought Leader And Share!

Pin It on Pinterest