Who Should Attend?
From Hospitals/Outpatient Surgery Centers/Ambulatory Centers/Community Hospitals

  • CEO’s
  • CFO’s
  • COO’s
  • Administrators
  • OR Managers
  • Directors
  • Surgical Services
  • Nursing Directors
  • Director, Perioperative Services
  • Surgical Director, Spine & Joint
  • Anesthesiologists
  • Medical Director
  • Medical Information Officer
  • Clinical Solutions
  • Operations Director
  • Billing
  • Marketing
  • Business Manager
  • Finance
  • Patient Safety
  • Equipment Planner
  • Compliance
  • Chief Nursing Officer
  • Director of Preadmissions

Also of interest Vendors/Medical Equipment Suppliers/Solution Providers

Conference Agenda

Day One - Thursday, February 24, 2022
7:15am – 8:00am

Conference Registration & Networking Breakfast

8:10am – 8:50am
Trends in Evolving Technologies in the Operating Room of the Future
Technology has much to offer the surgical disciplines. However, teamwork, open communication, and a willingness to adapt and adopt new skills and processes are critical to achieving improved clinical outcomes.

Business changes in healthcare have arisen because of, among other factors, advances in IT, and increased awareness and concern for patient safety. As a result, these changes have created an OR environment in which surgical teams work with a multitude of technology under increased uncertainty. The introduction of new technology has improved the technical performance of surgical procedures, but it has also led to unexpected interactions within the surgical team and new forms of errors, further contributing to levels of uncertainty. Present-day ORs are inefficient and overcrowded, and the turnover between cases is often lengthy and variable. New technologies and devices are often introduced haphazardly into an already technologically complex environment. Patient data are not well integrated or displayed in a timely fashion. This lack of integration further strains the system, resulting in further reductions in efficiency. This, in turn, potentially impacts patient safety and costs. Improved integration of high technology, along with teamwork and enhanced communication and coordination among services, providers, and staff, is essential to improve efficiency, enhance safety, and reduce the cost of care. Despite these daily realities, the traditional OR is being transformed as new technologies and paradigms are being introduced into the clinical environment. This session will examine some of the current trends in patient management and developing technologies that are likely to continue to impact the OR environment and the OR of the future.

Becky McKenzie, DNP, MBA, MSN, RN
Assistant Vice President
Perioperative Services
Duke University Hospital   

Kate Ulrich, MS, BSN, RN, NEA-BC
Assistant Vice President of Nursing
Perioperative Services
Duke University Health System

8:50am – 9:30am
Optimizing OR Capacity: Exploring Predictive and Prescriptive Analytics & Building a Data Driven Culture
Many hospital’s perioperative departments still have a long way to go in order to confidently rely on key performance metrics for data driven decision making.

Why? EHRs were not built to be decision support tools. However, EHRs have historically been relied on as the direct source of volumes of retrospective reports that do not provide visibility into the detail let alone provide predictive or prescriptive capabilities to help perioperative leaders make decisions that impact one of the hospital/health systems most expensive resources: OR Time

To successfully maximize utilization of OR time, perioperative leaders need to be able to:

  • Have easy access to transparent data, defensible metrics, and clear visualizations for both the board meetings and the surgeon hallway conversations;
  • Effectively use ALL OR time (both open time and blocked time) as best as possible;
  • Streamline the entire scheduling process to be 100% automated and digitized to schedule cases;
  • Predict block owners who won’t use block time far in advance and prescribe when they should release time (and how this can be done with 1 click);
  • Advertise open time in a fair, transparent, and credible way incorporating all “house rules” (for example no more than 3 concurrent Neurosurgery rooms);
  • Right size blocks in a fair, surgeon-centric manner;
  • Predict future volumes and trends to aide in staff and capital planning.

Learn how hospitals around the country are successfully leveraging predictive and prescriptive analytics and moving toward a fair, and transparent system for scheduling cases, managing Block and Open time while maximizing staff, equipment, and capital utilization. The results are impressive- $500k per OR per year improvement in revenue, 6% point+ increase in primetime utilization, growth of surgical market share, increased surgeon, staff and patient satisfaction.

Session Objectives:

  1. Describe the challenges with relying on EHR generated OR performance reports.
  2. Explain the difference between predictive and prescriptive analytics and how this data is being used to optimize OR performance
  3. Understand how your organization can put policies and structures in place to create a consistent and sustainable data-driven culture across your system.

Ashley Walsh, MHA
Vice President, Client Services iQueue for Operating Rooms
LeanTaaS

9:30am – 10:00am
Networking & Refreshments Break 

10:00am – 10:40am
Improving Patient Satisfaction in the OR
The number of surgeries in the U.S. on an annual basis is staggering. For the patient, any surgical experience is an encounter ranking high for anxiety and potential risk. Many surgeries carry inherently high risk of negative outcomes, and it is reasonable to believe that the accompanying stress level and apprehension the patient and his or her family experience are proportional. the hospital provider, the sheer volume provides incredible opportunities for healthcare professionals to study and improve upon patterns and policies concerning patient satisfaction in the OR. Delivering patient-centered care in the OR, for example, is an intrinsic element of a quality healthcare system and important for hospital profitability. This session will examine how to improve OR efficiency, lower wait times and improve patient experience.

Candy Ranshaw, BSN, RN, CNAMB
Chest Pain Coordinator
Steward Health 

10:40am – 11:20am
Patient Safety in the OR
Ensuring patient safety in the OR begins before the patient enters the operative suite. This session will examine efforts to improve operating room safety, for both the patient and the working personnel. Improving patient safety and value is an increasing priority for surgeons and hospitals as adverse outcomes and sentinel events can be catastrophic for patients, caregivers and institutions. Topics to be discussed will include reporting, data analysis and managing a complex environment to mitigate risk and reduce the probability of medical errors that often lead to adverse healthcare events.

Douglas Slakey, MD MPH
Professor and Chief of Surgical Services
Program Director, General Surgery Residency
CMC
Advocate Aurora Health

11:20am – 12:00pm
Pivoting During COVID-19 Pandemic Crisis to Sustain an OR Nurse Residency Program
Managing through COVID-19 crisis the six month OR Nurse Residency Program caused for threatening decisions to adjust from a face-to-face lecture and the hands-on simulation lab utilizing different presenters and vendors to a Virtual and Hybrid learning style. The significantly reduced surgical cases and in the hospital halted surgery completely. Only surgical emergency and urgent elective cases were performed during the COVID-19 crisis.  During this crisis, the biggest fear was the infectiousness unknown spread of COVID-19 that caused the world to take a pause pivot and redesign our normal daily activities, such as our day to day living, socializing, and just as important our work environment. The conservation of hand hygiene products, surgical masks, N95 masks, surgical gowns, gloves, and ventilators remain at the forefront of many hospitals’ essential commodity. The virus altered the path of the six-month program, in such a way, we could not progress with the regular schedule as planned. The OR nurse residents were sent to the labor pool and assigned to work in areas outside of the OR. And, some of the twenty-five nurse residents either transferred to another service area or resigned altogether.  This was the first time since 1985 Houston Methodist Hospital OR nurse residents completed the program with staggered dates that ranged from six months to nine months. 

Karen Y. Edwards, MBA, BSN, RN, CNOR
Professional Development Leader
OR Nurse Residency Program
Administration Perioperative Services
Houston Methodist Hospital 

12:00pm – 12:40pm
Developing an Effective Working Relationship with Other Hospital Staff and Departments

OR management structures and interrelationships both within the operating suite and with other departments in the hospital can be extremely complex. Different departments often have infrastructures of their own that may compete or conflict with the OR’s management hierarchy. Often, there really is little actual management of the operating suite as an entity. Because the units must interact effectively to provide a high level of patient care, it is important that areas of conflict be resolved. Many problems can be averted by implementation of specific policies and procedures, after appropriate action by the medical staff outlining operating room goals and objectives, and the establishment of realistic lines of authority and communication. More important than the actual structure of the management components in developing an efficient and successful OR is the ability of key management personnel to understand the dynamics of people and situations as they evolve. Management must also continually monitor and objectively evaluate the system so that areas of deficiency of conflict may be identified and policies or procedures adapted to adequately meet the changing needs of staff and patients. This session will explore how OR managers can develop effective working relationships and communication with other hospital staff and departments.

Tammy Hutton, MSN, RN, CNOR
Administrative Leader Perioperative Services
Emerson Hospital 

12:40pm – 1:40pm
Lunch Break 

1:40pm – 2:20pm
Improving OR Scheduling and Capacity Planning
Rising costs and diminishing reimbursements require hospitals to continually find ways to improve efficiency and productivity. The OR is a cost-intensive environment requiring efficient and effective management. The power of performance of the OR is critically dependent on the operational effectiveness of the surgical, anesthesia, nursing and allied health professionals providing care. As cost centers, ORs must run efficiently.  Operating room efficiency ensures financial health of the institution as a whole. Admission rates, OR utilization, and hospital census depend on a mix of surgical specialties and unimpeded access to surgical facilities. From minimizing operating room costs to creating an easier scheduling process to maintaining open communication with staff, this session will examine ways you can improve operating room efficiency.  

Tracy Diffenderfer, RN, MSN, CNOR
Administrative Director Tower Surgery
TriStar Centennial Medical Center 

2:20pm – 3:20pm
Panel: Protocols for Operating Room Preparedness During a Pandemic
The worldwide spread COVID-19 presents a challenge for emergency operative management. The transmission and virulence of this pathogen has raised concern for how best to protect operating room staff while effectively providing care to the infected patient requiring urgent or emergent surgery. Establishment of a clear protocol that adheres to rigorous infection control measures while providing a safe system for interfacility transport and operative care is vital to a successful surgical pandemic response. While emergency protocols must be rapidly developed, they should be collaboratively improved and incorporate new knowledge as and when it becomes available. These measures combined with practice drills to keep operating room personnel ready and able should help construct processes that are useful, easy to follow, and tailored to the unique local environment of each health care setting. This session will explore protocols for OR preparedness during a pandemic.

Panelists:

Bernard C. Camins, MD, MSc
Medical Director for Infection Prevention
Mount Sinai Health System
Professor of Medicine
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai 

Faith Colen, MSN, RN, CEN, CPHQ, NEA-BC
Director of Quality and Patient Safety
UPMC St. Margaret 

Hope Johnson DNP, MBA, RN, CNOR, NEA-BC
Administrator of Perioperative Services
Lehigh Valley Health Network 

3:20pm – 3:50pm
Networking & Refreshments Break 

3:50pm – 4:30pm
OR Management Strategies
ORs incur high costs and considerable amount of hospitals revenues. Demand for OR and procedural facilities appears to be increasing due to aging population and developments in surgery. The conventional solution has been to build new facilities. Building them and, of course, staffing them adequately is increasingly expensive. By contrast, committing to increase the productivity of existing facilities seems to be a wiser strategy. This session will examine proper OR management strategies and optimizing the whole process or chain of processes involved in the treatment of a patient. Topics to be discussed will include:

  • Setting clear goals for OR management
  • Improving productivity and efficiency while maintaining high-quality care at all times
  • Motivating personnel and teamwork in every step of the patient care process
  • Working smarter, not faster

Sheila R. Thompson, RN, BS
Practice Administrator
Twin Cities Pain Clinic and Surgery Center 

4:30pm – 5:15pm
Reinforcing Infection Prevention in the Operating Room
The operating room is a prime breeding ground for harmful pathogens to spread, resulting in surgical site infections. Infection control interventions are important for containing surgery-related infections. Surgical site infections are a frequent complication of surgical procedures and one of the most common forms of hospital acquired infection. For this reason, the OR should have well-developed infection control policies. infections. This session will examine the role of the infection preventionist, together with OR staff, in crafting policies and processes to cut down on these infections and ensure patient safety during surgical procedures.

Nakeisha Archer, DNP, MBA, RN, NE-BC, CNOR, CSSM
Director of Perioperative Services
Texas Children’s Hospital 

Angelica C. Harrell, MPH, CPH, CIC
Infection Control Coordinator
Texas Children’s Hospital 

5:15pm
End of Day One

Day Two - Friday, February 25, 2022
7:15am – 8:00am
Networking Breakfast 

8:00am – 8:15am
Chairperson’s Recap 

8:15am – 9:00am
1-2-3 Response to the COVID-19 Healthcare Staffing Crisis in Perioperative Services
Innovative and creative staffing and scheduling strategies are an absolute necessity. Initial assessment of currently available staffing resources, both licensed and non-licensed, with consideration for consolidation and centralization of roles and responsibilities and cross training is the initial priority. Arrangements for on-site and community training and education of perioperative nurses and surgical technologists with utilization of nationally approved courses and curriculum is secondary. Promotion of systemness through standardization of perioperative work flow processes and establishment of a staffing resource pool, that may include multistate licensure and clearances, is a tertiary consideration in promoting flexible scheduling of surgical patients and perioperative staff.

Edna Gilliam, DNP, MBA, RN, CNOR
Senior Director Perioperative Services
Nemours Children’s Hospital, Delaware 

Sharon Udy-Janczuk, EdD, MSN, RN, CNOR, NE-BC
Director of Nursing, Perioperative Services
Nemours Children’s Hospital, Delaware 

9:00am – 9:45am
Managing Complexities in the OR
Clinical work in the OR is considered challenging as it is complex, dynamic and often time- and resource-constrained. Important characteristics for successful management of complexities include adaptations and adaptive coordination when managing expected and unexpected events. However, there is a lack of research addressing what makes things go well and how OR staff describe how they do when responding to challenges and compensating for constraints. This session will explore how complexities are best managed operating room nurses, registered nurse anesthetists, and surgeons, and how these professionals can adapt to create safe care in the OR.

Stanford R. Plavin, MD
Director of Anesthesia
ENT Institute 

9:45am – 10:15am
Networking & Refreshments Break 

10:15am – 11:00am
How COVID-19 Changed the Course of the OR Nurse Residency Program
As COVID-19 spread across the United States and the World, Healthcare Leaders responded quickly to the call to prepare Nurse Residents and protect patients and all staff in the perioperative arena.  Leaders were faced with difficult decisions in support programs committed to practice transitions from academic setting to professional practice.  Nurse Residency Program Educators and Specialty Fellowship Programs, through innovative and human-centered measures developed alternative teaching methodologies to leverage or compensate nurse residents for the lack of clinical rotations due to the pandemic.  Alternative methods of teaching were not limited to virtual classroom didactic, curriculum modification, and regional best practice clinical skills sessions.  Innovative approaches to supporting the perioperative fellowship program demonstrated key elements essential to maintaining the integrity of the perioperative onboarding and orientation experience of the new graduate RN and transitional experienced RN.

Randy McClain, DNP, RN, NEA-BC
System Manager, Nurse Residency Program & Specialty Fellowships
Wellstar Health System 

11:00am – 11:45am
Interventions in Leadership, Operational Management and Process Improvement
Surgical services are typically the most profitable area for a hospital. With revenues often exceeding two-thirds of a hospital’s total, these services have become the lifeline sustaining hospitals in this turbulent healthcare market. Unfortunately, the culture and management structure in many hospital-based settings for surgical patient care have not changed much over the past 100 years. This slow progress has made it difficult for many hospitals to adapt to current value-based payment models and do more to overcome current financial woes. Some of the improvements in surgical care have exacerbated challenges facing surgical services. Noninvasive surgical technology, improved patient-centric care and revenue gain-sharing have fueled the continued out-migration of surgery from the hospital. Hospitals are left with an increasingly sick and aging surgical population, worsening payer mix and demanding surgeons who ask for costly technology and better access. Meanwhile, the hospital must maintain its urgent care and emergency services, putting additional strain on both its staff and budget. So, how should hospitals address these issues? Some are engaging in relatively radical transformation that starts with the surgeon’s office and extends across the patient’s entire surgical care continuum. This transformation requires a new and novel collaborative process that includes interventions in leadership, operational management and process improvement.

Errol Lobo, MD, PhD
Professor, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care
University of California San Francisco
Vice-President for Perioperative Services
UCSF Health 

11:45am – 12:30pm
Optimizing the Operating Room
Caring for patients in traditionally designed, large hospitals is often frustrating. Attempts at decreasing internal costs and inpatient length of stay are universally undertaken in order to address dwindling reimbursement, and patient care becomes more specialized and fractionated. These attempts have proven to be myopic, at best, and injurious to patient care and professional job satisfaction, at worst. This session will examine operational processes of the operating room as well as suggestions for operational improvements to optimize patients, to enhance satisfaction, efficiency and outcomes, all of which can be applied to all hospitals.

Brenda J. Kendall DNP, MS, RN, CNOR
Associate Chief Nursing Officer
Perioperative and Procedural Services
The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center 

12:30pm
Conference Concludes

Workshop – Friday, February 25, 2022
12:45pm – 2:45pm

Optimizing OR Supply Management Through Collaboration

With the growing involvement of Supply Chain in the OR, many aspects of OR supply chain management have improved.  At the same time, many OR managers and clinicians have felt a disconnect in the management of costs and decision-making when it comes to supplies.  Close collaboration and communication between clinicians and supply chain professionals is crucial to program success.  In addition, decisions must be guided by accurate cost data combined with clinical impact information.  The goal is to instill confidence that the right product will be available at the right place and right time.

This session will discuss the critical roles and collaboration forums necessary to an effective relationship persists between the OR and Supply Chain, regardless of the organizational structure or reporting lines.  In addition, use of technology to capture accurate and actionable cost data will be discussed.  Finally, fundamental principles in OR inventory management and supply logistics will be revisited to ensure OR managers and Supply Chain professionals are in sync.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and understand the roles and collaborative interactions necessary for a successful perioperative supply chain program.
  • Understand the principles for effective surgical cost management and supply distribution, and how they apply to both manual and technologically supported inventory systems
  • Identify the metrics critical for managing and monitoring the effectiveness of the perioperative supply chain program.

Bill Bailey, BBA
Vice President, Senior Supply Chain and Sterile Processing Consultant
Sullivan Healthcare Consulting

Featured Speakers

Becky McKenzie, DNP, MBA, MSN, RN

Becky McKenzie, DNP, MBA, MSN, RN

Assistant Vice President

Perioperative Services
Duke University Hospital  
Kate Ulrich, MS, BSN, RN, NEA-BC

Kate Ulrich, MS, BSN, RN, NEA-BC

Assistant Vice President of Nursing

Perioperative Services
Duke University Health System
Candy Ranshaw, BSN, RN, CNAMB

Candy Ranshaw, BSN, RN, CNAMB

Chest Pain Coordinator

Steward Health
Douglas Slakey, MD MPH

Douglas Slakey, MD MPH

Professor and Chief of Surgical Services

Program Director, General Surgery Residency
CMC
Advocate Aurora Health
Karen White-Edwards, MBA, BSN, RN, CNOR

Karen White-Edwards, MBA, BSN, RN, CNOR

Professional Development Leader Perioperative Service

OR Residency Program Facilitator
Houston Methodist Hospital

 

Tracy Diffenderfer, RN, MSN, CNOR

Tracy Diffenderfer, RN, MSN, CNOR

Administrative Director Tower Surgery

 
Bernard C. Camins, MD, MSc

Bernard C. Camins, MD, MSc

Medical Director for Infection Prevention

Mount Sinai Health System
Professor of Medicine
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Faith Colen, MSN, RN, CEN, CPHQ, NEA-BC

Faith Colen, MSN, RN, CEN, CPHQ, NEA-BC

Director of Quality and Patient Safety

UPMC St. Margaret
Hope Johnson DNP, MBA, RN, CNOR, NEA-BC

Hope Johnson DNP, MBA, RN, CNOR, NEA-BC

Administrator of Perioperative Services

Lehigh Valley Health Network
Sheila R. Thompson, RN, BS

Sheila R. Thompson, RN, BS

Practice Administrator

Twin Cities Pain Clinic and Surgery Center
Nakeisha Archer, DNP, MBA, RN, NE-BC, CNOR, CSSM

Nakeisha Archer, DNP, MBA, RN, NE-BC, CNOR, CSSM

Director of Perioperative Services

Texas Children’s Hospital
Angelica C. Harrell, MPH, CPH, CIC

Angelica C. Harrell, MPH, CPH, CIC

Infection Control Coordinator

Texas Children’s Hospital
Edna Gilliam, DNP, MBA, RN, CNOR

Edna Gilliam, DNP, MBA, RN, CNOR

Senior Director Perioperative Services

Nemours Children’s Hospital, Delaware
Sharon Udy-Janczuk, EdD, MSN, RN, CNOR, NE-BC

Sharon Udy-Janczuk, EdD, MSN, RN, CNOR, NE-BC

Director of Nursing, Perioperative Services

Nemours Children’s Hospital, Delaware
Stanford R. Plavin, MD

Stanford R. Plavin, MD

Director of Anesthesia

ENT Institute
Errol Lobo, MD, PhD

Errol Lobo, MD, PhD

Professor, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care

University of California San Francisco
Vice-President for Perioperative Services
UCSF Health
Brenda J. Kendall DNP, MS, RN, CNOR

Brenda J. Kendall DNP, MS, RN, CNOR

Associate Chief Nursing Officer

Perioperative and Procedural Services
The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
Bill Bailey, BBA

Bill Bailey, BBA

Vice President, Senior Supply Chain and Sterile Processing Consultant

Sullivan Healthcare Consulting
 Ashley Walsh, MHA

Ashley Walsh, MHA

Vice President, Client Services iQueue for Operating Rooms

LeanTaaS
Randy McClain, DNP, RN, NEA-BC

Randy McClain, DNP, RN, NEA-BC

System Manager, Nurse Residency Program & Specialty Fellowships

Wellstar Health System
Venue

Caesars Palace Las Vegas
3570 Las Vegas Blvd. South
Las Vegas, NV 89158
866-227-5944

** Mention BRI Network to get the discounted rate of $170/night ** or use link below:

https://book.passkey.com/go/SCBRI2

Sponsors and Exhibitors

Lead Sponsor

Safely improving OR utilization, growing surgical volume, and optimizing surgical staff productivity is a significant challenge. Although hospital leadership acutely understands that efficient use of OR time is extremely valuable to achieving the organization mission, they understand that maximizing OR utilization is really challenging. Fortunately, health systems are increasingly new and innovative ways of optimizing OR time. By providing perioperative leaders with direct access to transparent data, defensible metrics, visualizations, and easy-to-use tools “on the fly” through iQueue for Operating Rooms, Health systems are creating  credible, fair and transparent systems for managing Block and open time while maximizing staff, equipment and capital utilization. The results are impressive: $500K per OR per year improvement in revenue; higher surgeon, patient and staff satisfaction; increased primetime utilization; and growth of surgical market share

FAQ

Are there group discounts available?

  • Yes – Register a group of 3 or more at the same time and receive an additional 10% off the registration fee

What is the cancellation policy?

  • Cancellations received 4 weeks prior to the event will receive a refund minus the administration fee of $225. Cancellation received less than 4 weeks prior to the event will receive a credit to a future event valid for one year.

Can the registration be transferred to a colleague?

  • Yes – please email us in writing at info@brinetwork.com with the colleague’s name and title

Where can I find information on the venue/accommodations?

  • Along with your registration receipt you will receive information on how to make your hotel reservations. You can also visit individual event page for specific hotel information. The conference fee does not include the cost of accommodations.

What is the suggested dress code?

  • Business casual. Meeting rooms can sometimes be cold so we recommend a sweater or light jacket
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